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7-day free cancellation policy Free WiFi Free parking Meal Upgrade Room Upgrade Early Check In Late Check Out
Free WiFi
7-day free cancellation policy
Free parking
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Local TIME

14:51

Temperature

27 °C

Best rate guaranteed

7-day free cancellation policy Free WiFi Free parking Meal Upgrade Room Upgrade Early Check In Late Check Out

Best rate guaranteed

7-day free cancellation policy Free WiFi Free parking Meal Upgrade Room Upgrade Early Check In Late Check Out
Free WiFi
7-day free cancellation policy
Free parking
Local TIME

14:51

Temperature

27 °C

Best rate guaranteed

7-day free cancellation policy Free WiFi Free parking Meal Upgrade Room Upgrade Early Check In Late Check Out

Best rate guaranteed

7-day free cancellation policy Free WiFi Free parking Meal Upgrade Room Upgrade Early Check In Late Check Out
Free WiFi
7-day free cancellation policy
Free parking
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If you’d like to explore a bit further, there’s plenty to see in the local area, especially if you’re a nature lover. You can learn what the Kosgoda Turtle Hatchery is doing to help save local turtles, or go on a river trip on the Madu Ganga to see mangrove forests and prawn fishermen. Alternatively, you can take to the sea to go whale watching.

 

27°C

Climate

5-star

Property

Ocean

View

Triton Hotel

Previously known

Geoffrey Bawa

Architectural masterpiece

MADU GANGA RIVER SAFARI

Length of trip: 1– 2 hours

madu-ganga-1

The estuary of the Madu Ganga river is a complex coastal ecosystem of mangroves and islands. It may be one of the last remaining tracts of pristine mangrove forests in Sri Lanka.

A boat trip is a wonderful way of seeing some of the hundreds of species of plants and animals – monkeys eat fruit in the trees, a water monitor lizard glides slowly through the water, and cormorants, egrets and kingfishers wait patiently on the banks, eyeing the water for prey.

There are around 64 islands in the river and lagoon, from a tiny speck housing a deserted shrine to one housing 250 families connected to the mainland with a very long footbridge.

world.

WHALE WATCHING

During the months of November to April

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It’s an early start, as we leave Heritance Ahungalla at around 4am to catch a boat from Mirissa at 6.30am.

The whales usually start to appear after about an hour out to sea. Mostly blue whales, but sometimes killer whales also appear. Sightings of dolphins are also common on the way out and back.

We advise you to bring a hat and plenty of sun cream, as well as a camera and binoculars.

We arrive back to the hotel in time for lunch.

BRIEF GARDEN

Open: 10am – 5pm

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It was Bevis Bawa, brother of Heritance Ahungalla architect Geoffrey Bawa, who converted this former rubber plantation into a wonderful series of landscaped gardens.

Through clever planting and screening, you are led through a series of tableaux and views, nooks and bowers. Statues and artwork are dotted throughout, as well as in the minimalist house. Many are Bawa’s own work, while the Australian artist Donald Friend is also well represented.

LUNUGANGA

Open: 10am – 5pm

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Lunuganga was Geoffrey Bawa’s own estate, where he experimented with his ideas about space, light and scale for nearly 50 years.

When he bought the land in 1948 it was a rubber plantation on a peninsula jutting out into a lake. Over the years, Bawa painstakingly reshaped the land and the vegetation to fulfil his vision, in one case slicing off the top of a hill to improve his view of the lake.

Don’t expect a riot of flowers planted in neat borders. This is essentially a series of outdoor rooms with cleverly framed vistas – a Buddhist stupa on a hilltop, an artfully placed Grecian statue.

Bawa continued to change and experiment with the spaces and structures throughout his life until his final illness in 1998. On his death in 2003 the garden was left to the Lunuganga Trust and is now open to the public.

AMBALANGODA

Open: 9am – 5pm daily

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Ambalangoda, the closest village to Heritance Ahungalla, is known as a centre for antiques and masks.
At the Mask Museum you can see many types of mask. Most are made from kaduru, a light, pliable wood similar to balsa. After carving, the masks were traditionally sanded using rough leaves or shark skin.

Masks are used for several purposes in Sri Lanka. As well as featuring in traditional dance, drama and comedies, and in large pageants and processions, they are also used in ceremonies to exorcise demons or cure illnesses.

The museum also contains several puppets, made from the same type of wood and manipulated with strings. The average height of traditional puppets is around 4 feet, but those representing royalty or nobility are taller and heavier. Puppet shows are accompanied by music on the drum and seraphina, as well as singing.